Historic Sheet Music Collection

Document Type

Score

Publication Date

1840

Comments

Mrs. Smith, My Dear!

A favorite Comic Duett

Sung with enthusiastic Applause

by Miss Clarence Wells

and Mr. Quayle,

Written by J. S. Du Solle Esqr.

Adapted & Arranged by John Watson.

Philadelphia (196 Chestnut St.): Published by A.Fiot, Importer of Music & Musical Instruments (1840)

Some of the resources may contain offensive language or negative stereotypes. Such materials should be seen in the context of the time period and as a reflection of attitudes of the time. The items are part of the historical record, and do not represent the views of the libraries or the institution.

[Verse 1: Mr. Smith]
Mrs. Smith upon my word,
This is really too absurd,
There is surely no one like you,
Either far or near;
Winter, summer, autumn, spring,
You're for ever on the wing,
Never quiet for a moment,
Mrs. Smith my dear,
Winter summer, autumn, spring,
You're for ever on the wing;
Never quiet for a moment;
Mrs. Smith my dear.

[Verse 1: Mrs. Smith]
Mr. Smith, upon your conscience,
How can you talk such nonsense,
I fear your little judgement is'nt over clear;
Mrs. Jones, and Mrs. Noga, have both gone to Saratoga,
And Cape may was all I mentioned,
Mr. Smith my dear,
Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Noga, have both gone to Saratoga,
And Cape May was all I mention'd,
Mr. Smith my dear.

[Verse 3: Mr. Smith]
Mr.s Smith a plague upon it
Here's a single dress and bonnet,
yet the bill would frighten Croesus into fits;
Oh dear! As for Mrs. Jones the squinter,
Why she starves herself all winter;
And can well afford to travel;
Mrs. Smith my dear;
As to Mrs. Jones the squinter,
Why she starves herself all winter;
And can well afford to travel,
Mrs. Smith my dear.

[Verse 2: Mrs. Smith]
There's your wine and your cigars Sir,
(You've left the door ajar Sir
No occasion I believe to let the servants hear;)
Cost twenty times the sum too,
That all my habits come to,
Oh, bless me I've no patience,
Mr. Smith my dear;
Cost twenty times the sum too that all my habits come to,
Oh dear, bless me I've no patience,
Mr. Smith my dear.

[Verse 3: Mr. Smith]
Mrs. Smith I'm quite astounded, at your love for those confounded balls and parties, routs and concerts ev'ry night in the year;
As for my wants, they are real, and I'm sure that you can see all my expences,
Your's are endless, Mrs. Smith my dear;
Yes my wants are few and real,
And I'm sure that you can see all my expences,
Your's are endless,
Mrs. Smith my dear.

[Verse 3: Mrs. Smith]
Oh your wants! but where's your schemes, Sir?
Your million making dreams Sir?
Your Morus-Multi-caulis spee?
My dear, now my dear!
Out of all, my pretty Scholar, If you see a single dollar;
Why, l'in very much mistaken,
Mr, Smith my dear;
Out of all, my pretty Scholar,
If you see a single dollar;
Why, I'm very much mistaken,|
Mr. Smith my dear.

[Verse 4: Mr. Smith]
Mrs. Smith I'm quite distracted, at the habits you've contracted,
I'll not spare an other dollar
So wont that's clear;
On my life! its' very funny, not a thought about the money,
Where the mischief should it come from,
Mrs. Smith my dear.

[Verse 4: Mrs. Smith]
I dont ask you where you roam Sir
But this I know
At home Sir; there is very little of you, there we see or hear
And where you choose to by Sir;
Is a mystery to me Sir;
is a mystery to me Sir;
Pooh pooh nonsense.
Why, the fact is quite notorious,
Mr. Smith my dear.

[Verse 4: Mr. Smith]
How I hate these petty quarrels,
Oh dont impugn your morals,
And as really I've no wish to be at all severe;
Then suppose to make an end on't,
I shall say no more depend on't
And we'd better both be quiet,
Mr Smith my dear.
Then suppose we make an end on't I shall say no more depend on't,
For we'd better both be quiet, Mrs. Smith my dear.

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